Shift to federalism won’t adversely affect the economy- Palace

Shift to federalism won’t adversely affect the economy- PalaceShift to federalism won’t adversely affect the economy- Palace

Malacañang on Wednesday stressed that the proposed shift to federalism would not adversely

affect the economy after the country’s socioeconomic planning secretary warned about its impact on the country’s finances.

 

Presidential Spokesperson Harry Roque said the Palace has already discussed with Socioeconomic

Planning Secretary Ernesto Pernia his concerns about the proposed shift to federalism.

 

On the other hand, shift to federalism, we reiterate, would have no adverse effect on the Philippine economy. Our budget

would remain the same, as identified national projects would be devolved and transferred to the internal revenue

allotment (IRA) of local government units,” Roque said in a statement.

 

These projects include maintenance of barangay roads and bridges, water supply services, barangay health centers

and daycare centers, solid waste disposal system of municipalities, among others.”

 

Besides addressing One News Channel, Pernia forewarned about the impacts of a move to federalism to the areas that are not set up for the progress.

Federalism cause on nation’s monetary position

Nevertheless, the conceivable the harm move to federalism could cause on the nation’s monetary position President Rodrigo Duterte has effectively affirmed the draft government contract made by his consultative Committee.

Congress will at present investigation the proposition.

 

An ongoing Pulse Asia review indicated 2 out of 3 Filipinos are against changing the 1987 Constitution right now and

a larger part contradicts a move to federalism.

Consequently, Pundits blamed the organization for railroading contract change in an offer to draw out the decision gathering’s

hold to control.

Plebiscite on sanction change

House Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez has additionally proposed deferring one year from now’s mid-term races to make ready for a plebiscite on the sanction change.

Hence, Duterte has over and over guaranteed that he won’t utilize sanction change to remain in control past his term in 2022 ask the consultative board of trustees entrusted to propose alterations to the 1987 Constitution to ban him from running again and permit the decision of a progress president upon the endorsement of the changed sanction.

In the meantime, restriction figures have likewise cautioned of the noteworthy costs that changing the Constitution could involve.

Meanwhile, Senate hearing on Tuesday, Dr Rosario Manasan of the Philippine Institute of Development Studies said the formation of a central government will cost about P55 billion.

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